Tag Archives: history

Free Things to Do in Rapid City: Hiking to the Strato Bowl

Free Things to Do in Rapid City: Hiking to the Strato Bowl

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The Strato Bowl is the best of both worlds for us: Hiking for me, aviation for Mike. It was the such a fun Labor Day outing. We got some exercise, enjoyed incredible views and learned something new about aviation history.

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The Stratobowl is a small, flat valley completely surrounded by the Black Hills where some of the first early manned balloon flights were launched in the 1930s. In 1934 and 1935, the Army Air Corps and National Geographic Society launched manned balloon flights into the stratosphere from this location to a record 72,395 feet. The Explorer II flight proved man could survive the altitude in a pressurized capsule, an important part of the space program and our quest to walk on the moon. Since then, the Stratobowl has hosted aviation pioneers Ed Yost, Steve Fossett, Troy Bradley and others.

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The view is spectacular. There are few places where you will see such an interesting view including pine-covered hills, wide blue skies and the small stream that winds through that peculiar flat valley nestled between the Hills.

 

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Dogs are welcome on this  1.7-mile, moderately trafficked out-and-back trail. To get there, take Mount Rushmore Road into the Black Hills (16). Stay on 16 past Reptile Gardens and Bear Country USA. Just past the service station is a small parking area on the right-hand side (westbound), marked by powerlines.

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Kayaking on the Gulf Coast

Kayaking on the Gulf Coast

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We only stayed in Cedar Key, Florida, for a week, but we packed it full of fun stuff. One of our favorite things was kayaking out to Atsena Otie (which means cedar island in a tribal language). Mike and I shared a kayak and accompanied guide Mandy Davis and three of her friends on an awesome daylong adventure.

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travel, photography, Instagram, kayaking, outdoors, Hidden Coast Outdoors, Atsena Otie, Cedar Key, Florida, beach, water, hiking, history, cemetery, headstone rubbing

Mandy is an accomplished, seasoned naturalist and guide who’s recently set up shop in Cedar Key. She runs Hidden Coast Outdoors, and the Atsena Otie adventure is one of many tours she offers. Not only did Mandy show us how to kayak, but she also educated us on the history of Cedar Key. We learned that the city of Cedar Key was located on Atsena Otie Island. Cedar Key was an important port. Two mills on the island produced ‘cedar’ slats for shipment to northern pencil factories. Economic decline began when Henry Plant’s railroad to Tampa began service in 1886, and a devastating Atlantic hurricane in 1896 was the final blow.

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travel, photography, Instagram, kayaking, outdoors, Hidden Coast Outdoors, Atsena Otie, Cedar Key, Florida, beach, water, hiking, history, cemetery, headstone rubbing

We made the short hike to the now-closed pier and the cemetery. Mandy brought along paper and crayons so we could take headstone rubbings. I chose a grave marker with my name (except with a Z instead of an S). What a unique souvenir! We then kayaked further east for lunch. Mandy prepared a homemade, gourmet Mexican meal for us, and we ate on the beach near eaglets and other water birds.

travel, photography, Instagram, kayaking, outdoors, Hidden Coast Outdoors, Atsena Otie, Cedar Key, Florida, beach, water, hiking, history, cemetery, headstone rubbing

travel, photography, Instagram, kayaking, outdoors, Hidden Coast Outdoors, Atsena Otie, Cedar Key, Florida, beach, water, hiking, history, cemetery, headstone rubbing

It was a glorious experience, so much fun and a wonderful workout.  $90 (per person) VERY well spent!!

A walk through Memorial Park

A walk through Memorial Park

Memorial Park, Round Rock, Texas, dog walking, memorials, history, WWII, Vietnam, Brushy Creek, river walk, stairs, workout, outdoors, dogs, exercise,

We’re back in Milwaukee this week, in the middle of a snowstorm, so my jaunt through Memorial Park in Round Rock, Texas, a couple of weeks ago seems like a dream. Thank heavens for photographic evidence!

Memorial Park is home to the rock that gave Round Rock, Texas, its name.  The park is right off of I-35. Brushy Creek runs through the middle of it, and a pedestrian bridge under the highway connects both sides. There’s a playground on one side and the Sunset Strip apartment complex on the other. It’s a very pretty park although a little bit seedy.

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I stopped there with the dogs after I saw the park off the highway when I was dropping Mike off for work. I had no idea that the famous rock was there, so I missed it entirely. I guess I was close, though. From what I’ve read, if you want to see the rock, you need to walk over the low water crossing near the parking lot and go along the north side of the creek.

Memorial Park, Round Rock, Texas, dog walking, memorials, history, WWII, Vietnam, Brushy Creek, river walk, stairs, workout, outdoors, dogs, exercise,

I strolled in that direction but got sidetracked by the granite stadium stairs by the softball field. I just had to climb ’em! I did two sets with the dogs, but then Sadie refused to do any more. I wasn’t going to let our little diva hold me back, so I parked the bark babies in the Jeep and did another 13 sets for a total of 15.

Memorial Park, Round Rock, Texas, dog walking, memorials, history, WWII, Vietnam, Brushy Creek, river walk, stairs, workout, outdoors, dogs, exercise,

The rock isn’t the only cool piece of history in the park. There’s also a Vietnam War memorial and a commemorative WWII torpedo to honor Round Rock residents who fought on behalf of their town and country.

What a fun outing to remind me that there’s more to life than the deep freeze!

Coast-to-Coffice: Colectivo Fifth Ward

Coast-to-Coffice: Colectivo Fifth Ward

Colectivo, Fifth Ward, coffice, coffee shop, coffeehouse, Milwaukee, local, small business, freelance, writing, blogging, social media, Wi-Fi, free wifi

Sharing space with other commercial enterprises, Colectivo‘s Fifth Ward location upcycles a discarded building into a cool coffeehouse that pays homage to the past.  The Foundry café, in Milwaukee’s emerging Fifth Ward neighborhood, is housed in the former Kramer International foundry.

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When Milwaukee was first settled, the Fifth Ward encompassed the area south of the Fourth Ward, between the Milwaukee River and First Avenue.  Over time, that area was absorbed into Walker’s Point.  Unfortunately, as the years went by, Walker’s Point became associated with crime and pollution.  Interest in historic preservation and a desire to make the Fifth Ward more appealing prompted the re-adoption of the name.  Interestingly, Colectivo (which was then Alterra) began roasting on the fifth floor of a warehouse in Walker’s Point.

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The Kramer International foundry produced non-ferrous and ferrous products for pump manufacturers.  The café honors that manufacturing tradition and history with its post-industrial design.

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As with all the Colectivo shops, everything is baked fresh every day at the Bay View location.  They source from local farms as much as possible, and they also partner with other Wisconsin food producers.  Wi-Fi is free, although it does ask you to re-accept the usage agreement after a couple of hours.

Colectivo, Fifth Ward, coffice, coffee shop, coffeehouse, Milwaukee, local, small business, freelance, writing, blogging, social media, Wi-Fi, free wifi

The Fifth Ward location – with its friendly baristas, funky ambiance, reliable Wi-Fi, and range of great beverages and food – is an eccentric yet cozy place to be productive.

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Coast-to-Coffice: Colectivo Lakefront

Coast-to-Coffice: Colectivo Lakefront

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I’ve been sharing my coffices for a while now, but I’ve decided to formalize my reviews under a “Coast-to-Coffice” column.  My focus will be on locally owned, small business establishments, rather than the chains (although I enjoy working at Starbucks on occasion, too).  I’ve also added a page to the blog devoted to coffices.  That way, anyone who might be looking for a place to work and get to know a community while enjoying awesome beverages (and yummy eats) can check out where we’ve been.

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Colectivo Coffee began its life in Milwaukee as Alterra Coffee in 1993.   After years of building the business locally, Alterra attracted national attention, and the company sold its name and certain artistic assets to Mars Drinks.  They ultimately gave up their connection with Mars and renamed themselves Colectivo, a name which was “inspired by the artful and funky buses used for public transportation across Latin America, ‘colectivos’ (co-lec-TEE-vo), and the iconic part of everyday life they represent for everyday people”.  There are 12 cafes in the state, eight of which are in Milwaukee and its suburbs.

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The Lakefront location is across from McKinley Marina in the historic Milwaukee River Flushing Station which was built in 1888.  The Flushing Station’s purpose was to flush out pollution by pumping fresh water from Lake Michigan into the Milwaukee River. The cafe inhabits two-thirds of the building, and the flushing pump, which is still functioning, takes up the remaining third.

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My first reaction to learning that the coffee shop was in an old flushing station was, “Eww!”  A collaboration between a food and beverage company and the Milwaukee Metropolian Sewerage District seems kind of gross.  But, when you visit, all the nasty images are replaced by the quirky look and cool vibe Colectivo has created, not to mention the living museum quality of the flushing station elements.

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Colectivo’s Lakefront location goes beyond creating a sort of living history to include environmentally-friendly features.  There’s apparently a wetland garden that captures and filters parking lot runoff, although we couldn’t see it while we were there in late November.  And, supposedly plants on the grounds are irritgated by rainfall from the roof that’s routed into barrels.  The three levels of the cafe are made from recycled materials like wood decking from an old soap factory, brick and steel recovered from pre-existing buildings, and salvaged pump room wood.

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But what about the coffee?  The coffee is excellent, likely a result of the long-term farmer and co-op partnerships Colectivo has developed over the years. Colectivo also offers Letterbox Fine Teas, a hand-selected line of teas.  And the food’s pretty good, too.  Like the coffee, prices are reasonable.  Everything is baked fresh every day at the Bay View location.  They source from local farms as much as possible, and they also partner with other Wisconsin food producers.  Wi-Fi is free, although it does ask you to re-accept the usage agreement after a couple of hours.

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Every summer, the Lakefront location is also host to the Florentine Opera and Musica del Lago outdoor music series.  It’ll be fun to check that out when we’re here in the warm weather.

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Hazen’s Brigade Monument

Hazen’s Brigade Monument

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The timing of our stop in D.C. was fortuitous.  We were there right before the government shutdown, so everything was open.  We weren’t so lucky when Stevi took us to Murfreesboro to check out some Civil War sites.  But we didn’t let that deter us, and we drove around until we found places we could still visit.  One of them was Hazen’s Brigade Monument.

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Hazen’s Brigade Monument is a large stone structure built from thick limestone blocks that stands on the grounds of the Stones River Battlefield National Cemetery.  It was completed in May, 1863, four months after the Battle of Stones River. The monument is the oldest intact Civil War Memorial and was dedicated to the memory of the soldiers who perished during the battle.

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The downside of the visitor center being shuttered (because of the shutdown) was that we missed the opportunity to check out the “time capsule” objects.  They were found in 1985 when the monument was being repaired.   Nine battle-related items were found, including symbolically arranged artillery shells and musket barrels.

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There are two graves that lie outside the walls of the Hazen’s Brigade Monument.  William Holland and his grandson William Harlan were both U.S. military veterans.  William Holland lived long enough – 70 years – to go from being a slave, basically a piece of property, at the beginning of his life, to ending his life as a property owner and an American citizen.

Most monuments are built 30 years or more after the event by contractors.  Hazen’s Brigade Monument is unique in that it was built by comrades of the men buried there, mere months after they’d died.  How extraordinary that our modern fingers can touch those very same stones that Civil War soldiers assembled in loving tribute to their fallen brothers in arms!

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Hanging out at the Mall

Hanging out at the Mall

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A bicycle is a great way to explore a city, particularly when there’s a guide pedaling with you, sharing history and pointing out interesting facts.  Bike and Roll offers bicycle and Segway tours in five major metropolitan areas.  In Washington D.C., there are several tours available out of three different locations.  Mike and I took the Capital Sites tour, which departs from the Old Post Office Pavilion near the National Mall.

We were there just before the government shutdown, so everything was open.  (There was, however, a lot of activity on Capitol Hill.  I guess it wasn’t very productive, though.)  Riding Trek comfort hybrid bikes, we went from one end of the National Mall to the other, stopping along on the way as our guide filled us in on what we were seeing.  We rode by the Capitol Building, the Supreme Court and a variety of Smithsonian Museums as well as visiting the World War II Memorial, the Washington Monument, and more.

Our favorite memorial was the Korean War Memorial.  Nineteen life-size soldiers, scattered over a triangle of grass, are reflected in a large wall.  The nineteen and their reflections create 38 people, signifying the 38th Parallel, the latitudinal line that forms the boundary between North Korea and South Korea.  While most of the other memorials are very grand and almost overwhelming in their scope, this memorial is very intimate.  The soldiers stare haggardly in all different directions.  You can almost see them coming out of the bush, looking like deformed giants because of the ponchos covering the gear they’re carrying.  The wall itself is laser etched with faces taken from real footage. It’s a powerful remembrance.

For $40, which included a bottle of water and a granola bar, we covered over 7.5 miles of territory on our Bike and Roll tour and learned a lot about our nation’s history.  It was a wonderful and emotional experience.

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Air and Space

Air and Space

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Our next stop after hanging out with Grant and Barbie was Washington, D.C.  We were in town to inter Mike’s mum with his dad, who was buried in Arlington in 2003.  Evelyn passed away in early 2012, but it took a while for all of our schedules to sync up so we could reunite her with her husband of over 50 years.

Although the reason for the visit was bittersweet, we managed to fit in some fun.  With Mike’s passion for all things flying-related, a trip to the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C., was a “must do”.   Luckily, we were in D.C. right before the shutdown, so all the museums were open.

Of course, Mike was in aviation ecstasy the moment he stepped inside the Air and Space doors.  🙂  I was pretty excited, too, especially about the Wright Brothers exhibit – coming so close on the heels of our visit to First Flight.  While were at Air and Space, we saw two movies in the IMAX theatre: Air Racers (which was in 3D) and To Fly!  Both were good and gave our feet a nice rest after all the walking.

(The Instagram photos were taken by me.  The others were taken by Mike.)

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A walking tour of Colonial Williamsburg

A walking tour of Colonial Williamsburg

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As you might recall, we’re big fans of walking tours.  Instead of doing the Diva Dash I had originally planned for a Saturday in late September (which was based on us being in D.C. at that time, rather than staying in Virginia), we were able to score last-minute spots on a walking tour of Colonial Williamsburg, put on by, appropriately enough, Williamsburg Walking Tours.

Colonial Williamsburg is 301-acre living history museum.  It features 88 original Colonial-period buildings and was completely restored by the John D. Rockefeller Foundation in the late 1920s.  We had Trish, our knowledgeable and friendly guide, to ourselves as we started at the corner of the Palace Green by the Bruton Parish Church.  The Palace Green is a stretch of lawn, with trees lining the perimeter, that runs north from Duke of Gloucester Street up the center of Palace Street, with the Governor’s Palace at the far end and historic houses on either side.

There’s obviously too much history in Colonial Williamsburg for me to come close to capturing it all in this post, but here are a few interesting tidbits that we learned from Trish.

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The Father of Colonial Williamsburg

The Reverend Dr. W.A.R. Goodwin was rector of Bruton Parish Church.  As a His full name was Williams Archer Rutherfoord Goodwin, but he preferred to go by his initials.   Commonly known as “the Father of Colonial Williamsburg”, Goodwin spearheaded the preservation of and restoration of Colonial Williamsburg by successfully soliciting funding from John D. Rockefeller, Jr.

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George Wythe House

The First American Lawyer

One of Trish’s favorite Colonial Williamsburg’s characters is George Wythe, and when we learned about him, we could understand why.  Wythe was the first professor of law at the College of William and Mary, which was the first law school in North America.  He was also a legal adviser and law teacher to Thomas Jefferson.  Even more notable is that he was a signer of the Declaration of American Independence and served briefly at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia.  He opposed slavery and was considered a great statesman.  Wythe’s accomplishments in life were somewhat overshadowed in death, however, because he was allegedly murdered by his grand nephew George Wythe Swinney.  The teenage Swinney supposedly poisoned his grand uncle to get his inheritance, but thankfully Wythe lingered long enough to change his will before he passed away.  In an unexpected twist, William Wirt and Edmund Randolph, who are two of George Wythe’s closest friends and colleagues, represented Swinney at the trial. Wythe’s friends are the same people who help get his murderer acquitted. Wythe, though, would probably have been okay with that because they were following the law, which he held so dear.

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Ludwell-Paradise House

Loony Lucy Ludwell

The Ludwell-Paradise House dates back to 1755 and is a lovely example of Georgian architecture.  It was once home to Philip Ludwell III, a prominent member of London society who held a seat in the Governor’s Council. His daughter, Lucy, inherited the house when he passed away.  Lucy married John Paradise.   Although the pair traveled in the highest social circles in London, Lucy was an unconventional character in Williamsburg. Considered mentally unstable, she’d confuse herself for royalty, strutting down Duke of Gloucester Street with servants in tow, greeting her “subjects” with a royal wave.  This would apparently go on for hours.  She was also known for stealing dresses and compulsively bathing multiple times a day.  In 1812, Lucy’s delusions of grandeur and odd behavior landed her in the Public Hospital, where she died two years later.

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A curious contraption

The colonists hung clay jugs and bottles near the eves of their homes so that birds would nest inside. In exchange for shelter, hungry birds provided free pest control by eating bothersome insects.

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Sugar blues

During the Colonial period, refined white sugar came in the shape of cones and was wrapped in blue paper, hence the blue cones over the door of this shop.

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Scaling the roof

In colonial times, roofs were equipped with attached ladders so that they could be more easily scaled in case of fire.

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Where the best people resorted

Jane Vobe opened the King’s Arms Tavern in 1772, dubbing it the place “where the best people resorted.”  We didn’t dine there, but we’re told, if you do, your server will be dressed in 18th century fashion, ready to fill your table with Colonial eats such as game pie and a chop of shoat.

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The shot heard round the town

Palmer House is one of Colonial Williamsburg’s original 88 18th-century buildings and was known back in the day as the W.W. Vest House.  The regularly spaced niches in the Flemish-bond brick façade are called putlog holes.  These holes supported the scaffolding as masons laid brick.  In most cases, putlog holes were filled with mortar when construction was complete. Today, the putlog holes in the Palmer House remain open until the holiday season when they’re filled with apples, a tradition that started in 1953.

The Palmer House served as the Union headquarters for the provost marshal (military police) in Williamsburg’s occupation during the Civil War.  In 1863, the Provost Marshal was newly commissioned, 19-year-old Lieutenant William W. Disoway.  On October 13, a Private William Boyle, of the lieutenant’s own unit, was arrested for disorderly conduct –  apparently drunk and surly – as he tried to force his way into Williamsburg past a sentry. He was escorted to Lieutenant Disoway, who was sitting in the front doorway of Mr. Vest’s house, reading a newspaper.  Disoway ordered Private Boyle taken back to camp to sober up and return in the morning. Instead, Boyle pulled out his service revolver and threatened to shoot the Lieutenant. Disoway tried to keep the situation calm by ordering the surrounding guards not to fire their muskets, but Boyle shot Disoway anyway, killing him instantly.

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The Capitol Building stands at the east end of the Duke of Gloucester Street and was the last stop on our tour with Trish.  The current structure is the third capitol in that spot; it’s a complete rebuilding on the earlier foundations of the original structure.  The original structure was started in 1701 when the colonial Capitol was moved from Jamestown to Williamsburg, or Middle Plantation as it was first called.  Construction was finished four years later.  The capitol was subsequently moved to Richmond in 1780 during the Revolutionary War.  After two fires ravaged the building, Trish told us, the secretary insisted on having a separate building to work in.

Trish did such a good job on our daytime walking tour that we went back that night for her ghost tour.  We highly recommend taking a Williamsburg Walking Tour when you’re visiting Colonial Williamsburg, and be sure to ask for Trish as your guide.

A walking tour of Amana

A walking tour of Amana

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The Amana Colonies have an interesting history.  German Inspirationists were persecuted for their religion in their native land.  That, combined with a poor economy, forced them to flee to the United States in the 1840s, settling initially in Buffalo, New York, and then moving in 1855 to the Iowa River valley when more farmland was needed to support their community.  Their community consisted of seven villages, a mile or two apart, that they named Amana, a word from the Song of Solomon that meant “remain faithful.”

The Amana Colonies would become one of America’s longest-lived and largest religious communal societies.

In the seven villages, residents received a home, medical care, meals, all household necessities and schooling for their children. Property and resources were shared. Men and women were assigned jobs by their village council of brethren. No one received a wage. No one needed one.

Farming and the production of wool and calico supported the community, but village enterprises, everything from clock making to brewing, were vital, and well-crafted products became a hallmark of the Amanas. Craftsmen took special pride in their work as a testament of both their faith and their community spirit. The Amana villages became well known for their high quality goods.

The unhurried routine of life in old Amana was paced very differently than today. Amana prayer meetinghouses, located in the center of each village, built of brick or stone, have no stained glass windows, no steeple or spire, and reflect the ethos of simplicity and humility. Inspirationists attended worship services 11 times a week; their quiet worship punctuating the days.

Over 50 communal kitchens provided three meals daily to Colonists. These kitchens were operated by the women of the Colony and well supplied by the village smokehouse, bakery, ice house and dairy as well as huge gardens, orchards and vineyards maintained by the villagers.

The Great Depression ended the communal way of living.  The history was well preserved, though, and in 1965, the Amana Colonies were declared at National Historic Landmark.  Communal kitchens are now restaurants, and high quality handicrafts are still made in the area.  Although they don’t attend 11 services a week, men and women still enter the churches through distinct doorways and sit in separate pews.

I highly recommend taking the walking tour of Amana.  It’s just $7 for adults ($2 for children).  There are also beer and wine events and food sampling tours.  Whatever you decide to do, you’ll enjoy discovering the historical aspects of communal life, architecture, and agriculture of the area.

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